Darmstadt, Germany, April 14, 2016 – Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, a leading science and technology company, today announced that clinical and real-world data about interferon beta-1a (Rebif), will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN) 68th Annual Meeting, taking place April 15-21, 2016, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

A real-world assessment of relapse rates in patients with MS newly initiating self-injectable treatment with interferon beta-1a versus an oral disease-modifying therapy, as well as the clinical effect of interferon beta-1a on ‘no evident disease activity’ (NEDA) and MRI outcomes, will be revealed in data presented by Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.

“Patients with MS have more choices than ever before, but, given the potential devastation of this disease, consistent validation and balance of comparative effectiveness is paramount to selecting the most appropriate treatment,” said Rick Munschauer, Vice President, Medical Affairs, Neurology and Immunology, EMD Serono, the biopharmaceutical business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, in the U.S and Canada. “We are committed to enhancing care for people living with MS. That commitment includes continuing to deepen our understanding of the clinical and real-world impact of Rebif to inform the most optimal choice of therapy for patients. With a well-established safety profile supported by more than 20 years of combined clinical trial and patient experience and efficacy across three key disease measures – including reducing relapse rates and delaying disability progression – Rebif is an important treatment option for relapsing MS.”

The following abstracts have been accepted for presentation at the 68th AAN Annual meeting:

TitleLead AuthorAbstract/Poster #Presentation date/timeSession
Predictive Value of 6-Month T2 and Enhancing Lesions Among Patients with RRMS Receiving Interferon -1a Subcutaneously Thrice Weekly or Placebo: Post Hoc Analyses of PRISMS DataD. LiP1.401April 16, 2016
5:30 p.m.
Poster Session P1: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Age-, Sex-, and Geographic Region-Specific Comorbidity in Patients with Multiple SclerosisNC. EdwardsP2.190April 17, 2016
4:00 p.m.
Poster Session P2: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Outcomes in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Treated with Cladribine Tablets: Results from the 120-Week Phase IIIb Extension of the CLARITY StudyG. ComiP2.114April 17, 2016 4:00 p.m.Poster Session P2: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Role of Family Planning in Women of Child-Bearing Age with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Switzerland: Results of the Women with MS (WWMS) Patient SurveyS. MuehlP2.105April 17, 2016 4:00 p.m.Poster Session P2: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Adherence to Subcutaneous IFN-1a - Final Analysis of the Non-Interventional Study READOUTsmart Using the Dosing Log and Readout Function of RebiSmartP. RieckmannP3.098April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Association of Timing of Disease-Modifying Drug Treatment Initiation on Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Rates in Newly Diagnosed PatientsAL. PhillipsP3.118April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Clinical Efficacy of Cladribine Tablets in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS): Final Results from the 120-Week Phase IIIb Extension Trial to the CLARITY StudyG. GiovannoniP3.028April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Effect of Early Versus Delayed Subcutaneous Interferon (scIFN) -1a to Achieve No Evidence of Disease Activity (NEDA) in Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS): a Post-Hoc Analysis of REFLEXIONP. CoyleP3.111April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Efficacy of Cladribine Tablets* as Add-On to IFN-Beta Therapy in Patients with Active Relapsing MS: Final Results from the Phase II ONWARD StudyX. MontalbanP3.029 April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Efficacy of Cladribine Tablets* in ORACLE Study Patients who Retrospectively Met 2010 McDonald Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Criteria at BaselineMS. FreedmanP3.035April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Interferon -1a SC tiw Reduces Mild to Moderate and Moderate to Severe Relapses and Disease Activity over 1 Year in Patients with Relapsing MS: Post Hoc Analyses of PRISMS DataA. BosterP3.036April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Natural and Inducible Regulatory T Cell Subsets in a Large Cohort of Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-Beta and Followed for 24 MonthsF. SeranaP3.077April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Safety and Tolerability of Cladribine Tablets* in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS): Final Results from the 120-Week Phase IIIb Extension Trial to the CLARITY StudyS. CookP3.095April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Slowing of Disability Progression Based on 6-Month Confirmed EDSS in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Treated with Cladribine Tablets* in the CLARITY Study: a Post-Hoc Subgroup AnalysisS. CookP3.058April 18, 2016 5:30 p.m.Poster Session P3: 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
MRI Frequency and No Evidence of Disease Activity Status Among Patients with RRMS Receiving IFN -1a SC tiw or IFN -1a IM qw: Post Hoc Analyses of EVIDENCEAT. RederP6.190April 21, 2016
4:00 p.m.
Poster Session P6: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Predictive Value of Early MRI Measures for Long-Term Disease Activity in Patients with Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Receiving IFN -1a SC tiw or IFN -1a IM qw: Post Hoc Analyses of the EVIDENCE StudyPK. CoyleP6.189April 21, 2016
4:00 p.m.
Poster Session P6: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Real-World Assessment of Relapse Rates in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Newly Initiating Subcutaneous Interferon -1a vs Oral Disease-Modifying DrugsCM. KozmaP6.178April 21, 2016
4:00 p.m.
Poster Session P6: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
*Cladribine tablets is an investigational product and not approved for use in any indication in the United States. RebiSmart, an electronic device for self-injection of Rebif, is also not approved in the United States.